SIDEWINDER LURES SEA ANGLER REVIEW 2

SIDEWINDER LURES SEA ANGLER REVIEW 2

Sidewinders are the new lures on the block

Scientists tell us that colour ceases to exist below a certain depth. It is claimed that as the depth of water increases, each colour of the spectrum gradually fades away, with red being the last to disappear into the dark abyss.

Experienced wreck anglers scoff at the science as being a pile of tosh. They know that regardless of how much proof the boffins offer, the colour of the lures they use can have a major impact on a day’s sport, regardless of fishing depth.

For many years countless wrecks littering the seabed have formed the backbone of offshore angling. Home, even if temporary, to pollack, cod, bass, ling and conger eels, it has taken years of development among skippers, anglers and tackle companies to work out what lures work best over these rusting hulks.

Throughout the 1970s and early 1980s no angler would dream of stepping aboard a wrecking boat without having a supply of the deadly 6.5″, 172mm Red Gill rubber eels in their tackle box. They would always carry a selection of colours, including the three must haves of the day – black, red and orange.

During the mid 1980s jellyworms were in vogue, and as the 1980s slipped into the 90s various soft rubber shads became the most effective because, of course, these were the lures everyone was using.

In recent years there has been a new lure on the block – the Sidewinder – and it is a fair bet that wherever you find anglers targeting pollack, cod or bass offshore these days, you will find that Sidewinder lures are often the first choice.

Torquay skipper Kevin Tate, like many Channel and Western Approaches skippers, is a great fan of Sidewinders, saying they are the most effective lures around at the moment. Whether or not a Sidewinder would catch any more fish than those ground-breaking 172mm Red Gills is open to debate – that they are a highly effective lure is not.

“The most successful pollack and cod anglers aboard my boat are the ones who use 6″ Sidewinders”, said Kevin, who has so much faith in them he even keeps a stock on board just in case customers run out.

“These lures are deadly for pollack and cod, and interestingly it is the lure most commercial rod and line anglers use”, he revealed. Choice of lure colour always triggers a raging debate, and it was one issue I wanted to nail before we started fishing a wreck lying 30 miles off the South Devon coast.

“For pollack you’ll not beat a Ghost White lure, but if you want to specifically target cod then Rhubarb and Custard is the one to use”, said Kevin. “Of course, each day and tide is different and the optimum colour of choice can vary, even over the same day, so it is always wise to carry a range of colours and always keep an eye on what colour the most consistent anglers are using.

“The rule is to always have Ghost White or Rhubarb and Custard in your lure wallet”, he added.

SIDEWINDER SEA ANGLER MAGAZINE REVIEW 2 PAGE 1

SIDEWINDER SEA ANGLER MAGAZINE REVIEW 2 PAGE 2

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